Behind the scenes with Adam Finck

Meet Adam Finck.

Adam Finck

Yes, he’s good looking. But he’s also a smarty-pants and is our Director of Programs in central Africa. He recently traveled to DR Congo and brought along his handy iPhone. Which obviously translates to behind-the-scenes-instagram-filtered photos.

On patrol with park rangers in Garamba National Park (GNP). GNP has been a safehaven for the LRA since 2006, when Kony and his forces were forced out of Uganda and took to hiding in the park. LRA groups continue to hide in this vast forest, setting up camps for days or weeks at a time, and launching attacks into neighboring communities.

On patrol with park rangers in Garamba National Park (GNP). GNP has been a safe haven for the LRA since 2006 when Kony and his forces were forced out of Uganda and took to hiding in the park. LRA groups continue to hide in this vast forest, setting up camps for days or weeks at a time, and launching attacks into neighboring communities.

No hippos were harmed during this Instagram photo.

No hippos were harmed during this Instagram photo. (yes, they’re hippos – not ducks)

Margaux, one of our field staff in DRC, making friends in Garamba during one of the rangers' daily patrols.

Margaux, one of our field staff in DRC, making friends in Garamba during one of the rangers’ daily patrols.

Last month, our staff traveled through Garamba to link in their ranger stations to Invisible Children's early warning radio network. Much of the park is a forested Savannah, with dense forest opening up to vast grass clearings, like this one. The LRA inhabiting the park live off of poached game meat and supplies that they loot from nearby communities.

Last month, our staff traveled through Garamba to link in their ranger stations to Invisible Children’s early warning radio network. Much of the park is a forested Savannah, with dense forest opening up to vast grass clearings, like this one. The LRA inhabiting the park live off of poached game meat and supplies that they loot from nearby communities.

Garamba National Park

Your’e officially in Garamba National Park. Welcome.

Crossing rivers takes some ingenuity...and a little elbow grease.

Crossing rivers takes some ingenuity…and a little elbow grease.

There's those hippos again.

There’s those hippos again.

Refueling at a ranger station in the southern end of GNP.

Refueling at a ranger station in the southern end of GNP.

Park rangers patrol Garamba each day, looking for signs of poaching and armed group activity. Park rangers recently tracked and clashed with an LRA group that was poaching giraffe in the park.

Park rangers patrol Garamba each day, looking for signs of poaching and armed group activity. Park rangers recently tracked and clashed with an LRA group that was poaching giraffe in the park.

Luis Moratinos has dedicated the last five years of his life to the conservation of Garamba National Park. As the park's director, he oversees operations to protect wildlife and drive the LRA and poachers out of Garamba. Recent reports show that the LRA have increasing been poaching elephants for their ivory. The park's elephant population has fallen from 20,000 to just 2,000 elephants over the last three decades, with more elephant carcasses being found every month.

Luis Arranz has dedicated the last five years of his life to the conservation of GNP. As the park’s director, he oversees operations to protect wildlife & drive the LRA and poachers out of Garamba. Recent reports show that the LRA have increasingly been poaching elephants for their ivory. The park’s elephant population has fallen from 20,000 to just 2,000 elephants over the last three decades, with more elephant carcasses being found every month.

2 Responses

  1. Nicole says:

    Thanks so much for these images. It’s great to have a visual perspective of the realities in GNP. Thanks for all you do, Invisible Children. (Thanks to the park rangers and Luis Moratinos, too.)

  2. Ketija says:

    I just today came over this website and even for the first time saw the “Kany 2012″ video, I wish I could have seen it sooner, as I am from a small country where maybe only few have heard about this, I would like to help and keep up with the news!

    Thank you, all the people who cares and thank you for making it possible to see what’s going on there and help them!

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