Bekah (middle) with the Northern Exposure Roadie team

Bekah (middle) with the Northern Exposure Roadie team

It is in the moments of decision that your fate is determined.

It’s undeniable that the slightest encounters of the universe have the possibility of changing your life. This is called fate, which we embrace wholeheartedly at Invisible Children. Filling out the wrong online form, opening your home to a stranger, and stumbling upon a phone number are all circumstances when, occurring in isolation are meaningless, but when dealt by the wiser hand of fate created a powerful chain of events for 15-year-old Bekah Bass.

Grand Manan island which is in New Brunswick, Canada / possibly heaven

Grand Manan island which is in New Brunswick, Canada / possibly heaven

Bekah first heard of IC when one of our original films was screened in her community; however, much younger Bekah wasn’t allowed to watch the film (real life isn’t all happy endings #truth) It wasn’t until Bekah watched KONY 2012 that she took it upon herself to research our organization (1st reason we love her: initiative) and in the process mistakenly filled out our online form to host a screening. Out of sight out of mind – or so she thought.

Fast forward a week, the Bass family graciously opened their home to two members from Harvest House, a youth ministry touring New Brunswick. Unexpectedly, Bekah learned that one of these house guests was a young girl from the Democratic Republic of Congo whose family was seeking asylum in Canada to escape the escalating violence throughout their homeland. The prominent exposure to LRA issues continued when just days later one of IC’s Regional Managers, Bryan Funk, called to inquire about the screening request Bekah unintentionally submitted. Thus begun the makings of a beautiful IC friendship.

“I think it was destined (for lack of a better word) for me to become involved with IC. Doing something completely out of my comfort zone, and standing up for something that is very close to my heart has inspired me…I am forever inspired and challenged to help make the world a better place.”

When the rest of Grand Manan’s students were relishing in their dwindling summer vacation time, Bekah was busy rallying her small island community to attend her MOVE screening – with tremendous success. Our Northern Exposure Roadies stepped off a two-hour long ferry ride (because that’s the only way to get to Grand Manan in case you were wondering) and were welcomed by nearly 100 island residents. The audience, previously unaffiliated with Invisible Children or our cause, ended up staying an additional two hours beyond the film screening asking questions and ultimately becoming IC supporters themselves.

Despite numerous roadblocks (no funds/ remember the island thing…) Bekah kept her promise to reunite with us at MOVE:DC, saying “It wasn’t really a decision; I just knew I had to be there.” Bekah fundraised the money to get herself to DC, even having surplus funds which she additionally donated to IC. If you think you have a good excuse for not showing up at MOVE:DC keep in mind that DC isn’t even Bekah’s national capital.

“Hey, I showed up, I was there standing up against injustice.”

“Hey, I showed up, I was there standing up against injustice.”

Bekah and her mother at MOVE:DC

Bekah and her mother at MOVE:DC

Bekah undeniably proves when it comes to changing the world, age doesn’t matter. It’ll never be as simple as merely acknowledging you have a passion for something because the difference between who you are and who you want to be is what you do. And we strongly believe that once you commit to the right decision, the universe is in a conspiracy to make it happen.

“This sounds really cliché, but I believe that becoming involved with Invisible Children has made me a better person. It’s changed my life. I now have a support group of people who are telling me I can change the world. It’s incredible. I am so thankful!”

Bekah in front of the Washington Monument

Have a story of how being involved with IC has changed your life? E-mail mretka@invisiblechildren.com cause she thrives off of supporter stories, if you haven’t noticed already.

(Grand Manan photo credit: Barry Coombs)